rose.jpg (4818 bytes)

AMERICANS IDENTIFIED SINCE 1989
WWII, KOREA, COLD WAR

red.gif (1122 bytes)

Jan 2005 - Dec 2005

Jan 2006 - May 2007

June 2007 - Dec 2008

Jan 2009 - June 2009

June 2009 -Dec 2010

Jan 2011 - Dec 2012

Jan 2013 - Dec 2013

Jan 2014 - Dec 2015

Jan 2016 - Dec 2016

2017
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Stories and Press Releases below chart

Research sites: 

www.kpows.com

http://www.kpows.com/thezimmerleereports.html

2017

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Seaman 1st Class Monroe Temple U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/22/2017
Pvt. Donald S. Spayd U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 3/16/2017
Fireman 1st Class Charles R. Casto U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/15/2017
Pfc. Robert E. Mitchell U.S. Army Company F, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 9/6/1950 South Korea 3/13/2017
Fireman 1st Class Elmer T. Kerestes U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 3/6/2017
1st Lt. Robert E. Oxford U.S. Army Air Forces 425th Bomber Squadron, 308th Bomb Group, 14th Air Force 1/25/1944 India 3/6/2017
Pfc. Manuel M. Quintana U.S. Army Company K, 3rd Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment 7/27/1950 South Korea 3/4/2017
Sgt. Willie Rowe U.S. Army Company L, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 11/25/1950 North Korea 3/2/2017
Capt. Daniel W. Thomas U.S. Air Force Reserve 23rd Tactical Air Support Squadron 7/6/1971 Vietnam 2/25/2017
Fireman 1st Class Walter B. Rogers U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/23/2017
Fireman 1st Class Lawrence H. Fecho U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/23/2017
Seaman 1st Class Paul S. Raimond U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/23/2017
Steward's Mate 1st Class Cyril I. Dusset U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/23/2017
Pvt. William D. Gruber U.S. Army Air Forces 93rd Bomber Squadron, 19th Bomber Group 9/27/1942 Philippines 2/22/2017
Fireman 1st Class Charles W. Thompson U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/17/2017
Cpl. Billie J. Jimerson U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division 11/28/1950 North Korea 2/15/2017
Fire Controlman 3rd Class Robert L. Pribble U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/14/2017
Muscian 1st Class Elliot D. Larsen U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/8/2017
Seaman 2nd Class George T. George U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2/8/2017
Storekeeper 2nd Class Glenn G. Cyriack U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/7/2017
Fireman 1st Class William H. Kennedy U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/7/2017
Gunner's Mate 1st Class Arthur C. Neuenschwander U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/6/2017
Fireman 1st Class Michael Galajdik U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/3/2017
Fireman 3rd Class Robert N. Walkowiak U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 2/3/2017
Sgt. Donald D. Noehren U.S. Army Headquarters and Headquarters Service Company, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 11/30/1950 North Korea 2/3/2017
2nd Lt. John D. Mumford U.S. Army Air Forces 318th Fighter Squadron, 325th Fighter Group, 15th Air Force 6/6/1944 Ukraine 1/17/2017
Captain Robert R. Barnett U.S. Air Force 8th Bomb Squadron 4/7/1966 Laos 1/13/2017
Sgt. James W. Sharp U.S. Army Battery B, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division 12/6/1950 North Korea 1/10/2017
2nd Lt. Charles E. Carlson U.S. Army Air Forces 62nd Fighter Squadron, 56th Fighter Group, Eighth Air Force 12/23/1944 Germany 1/9/2017
1st Lt. William J. Gray U.S. Army Air Forces 391st Fighter Squadron, 366th Fighter Group 4/16/1945 Germany 1/5/2017
Mr. Peter W. Atkinson Civilian Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company, American Volunteer Group, "Flying Tigers" 10/25/1941 Burma 1/4/2017
Mr. Maax C. Hammer, Jr. Civilian Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company, American Volunteer Group, "Flying Tigers" 9/22/1941 Burma 1/4/2017
Mr. John D. Armstrong Civilian Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company, American Volunteer Group, "Flying Tigers" 9/8/1941 Burma 1/4/2017
2nd Lt Ernest Matthews U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Headquarters Company, Headquarters Battalion, Division Special Troops, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Pfc. James O. Whitehurst U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Pfc. Larry Roberts U.S. Marine Corps Special Weapons Group, 2nd Defense Battalion, Fleet Marine Force 11/25/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Gunnery Sgt. Sidney A. Cook U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Cpl. Walter G. Critchley U.S. Marine Corps Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa 1/4/2017
Mess Attendant 1st Class Ralph M. Boudreaux U.S. Navy USS Oklahoma 12/7/1941 Pearl Harbor 1/3/2017
1st Lt. William C. Ryan U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Marine Fighter Attack Force 115, Marine Aircraft Group 13, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, Fleet Marine Force Pacific 5/11/1969 Laos 1/3/2017

      Note:  the above chart is now updated in it's entirety regularly after it was noticed that names were INSERTED in the chart long after the accounted for date, changing the original chart.
Some articles below were NOT posted to the DPAA "list" when this was published.

posted 03/27/2017                       Source:    http://www.dpaa.mil/OurMissing/RecentlyAccountedFor.aspx
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-ForSorted By Accounted-For In Descending Order
Sgt. Donald D. Noehren U.S. Army Headquarters and Headquarters Service Company, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 11/30/1950 North Korea 2/3/2017

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 27 March, 2017 09:35
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Iowa Soldier Accounted For From Korean War (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Sgt. Donald D.
Noehren, 23, of Harlan, Iowa, unaccounted for from the Korean War.

He will be buried April 3 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,
D.C.

His niece, Peggy Booth, of Carlsbad, California, is available for interviews
if you would like to contact her at 760-929-1111.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Noehren on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////

In late November 1950, Noehren was a member of Headquarters and Headquarters
Service Company, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division,
fighting units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in North
Korea, in a delaying action south from the Ch'ongch'on River to Kunu-ri.
The unit was ordered to withdraw, and encountered a number of heavily
defended enemy roadblocks, continuous enemy mortar, small arms and
machine-gun fire.  Many soldiers, including Noehren, were captured.  He was
declared missing in action as of Nov. 30, 1950.

Noehren's name did not appear on any POW list provided by the CPVF or the
North Korean People's Army, however two repatriated American prisoners of
war reported that Noehren died at Hofong Camp, part of Pukchin-Tarigol Camp
Cluster, on Jan. 22, 1951.  Based on this information, a military review
board amended Noehren's status to deceased in 1951. 

In April and May of 2005, a Joint Recovery Team conducted the 37th Joint
Field Activity in Unsan County, South Pyongan Province, North Korea.  On
April 19, the team visited a site reported by a local witness to contain
American remains. 

To identify Noehren's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched a
brother, sister and nephew, as well as anthropological analysis, which
matched his records and circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,757 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Patrick
Sent: 27 March, 2017 07:23
Subject: Dignified transfer of Battle of Tarawa Marine From World War II Accounted For Fulfilling Our Nation’s Promise

 

Morning,

Marine Pvt. Harry K. Tye, 21, of Orinoco, Kentucky, will be buried with full military honors March 28 in Arlington National Cemetery. Tye died sometime on the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015 and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis was used which matched Tye’s records; as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

 

 

Respectfully,


Patrick J. Hughes U.S.M.C. Chu
Lai 67-68
God Bless America

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 27 March, 2017 08:38
Subject: Sailor Missing From World War II Identified (Temple) (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Seaman 1st Class Monroe Temple, killed in the attack on
the USS Oklahoma during World War II, have now been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Temple was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored
at
Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.
The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly
capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,
including Temple. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of
the
USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Temple.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of
his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~


 
MIA Korean War soldier finally coming home ... military file that made that connection through the Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency....

 

The newly identified remains of Army Cpl. Jules Hauterman Jr. of Holyoke will be returned to Massachusetts Wednesday after more than six decades at a military cemetery in Hawaii, where they were kept under the name “Unknown X-15904.”

  His dog tags were with his remains and DPAA has had them since 1990!    mc
 
BERLIN NH — Army Cpl. Joseph Norman Pelletier will be laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery Tuesday, more than 65 years after the Berlin man died in a North Korean POW camp.    Raymond Pelletier said he was shocked late last year when he received a call from the Army’s Repatriation Unit reporting that his brother’s remains had been identified.
From: richard <richard@storytellerfilms.tv>
Cc: richard <richard@storytellerfilms.tv>
Sent: Wed, Mar 22, 2017 3:12 pm
Subject: The MIA film progress report
 
An update:

We have moved the Solemn Promise film forward.
 
Here are the links for two segments of the film done in modular form. 
When we finish the project and secure a celebrity Voice-Over the VO track will be re-produced.
 
www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzibI9qdGFY WWII widow of MIA; Betty Seale.
 
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qgt1pgFZ2so  Recovering MIAs; interview with Deputy Director of DPAA.
 
Contact for more information is shown below. 
 
Richard Jellerson
626.355.0260
Screen Storyteller Original Films at storytellerfilms.tv

 

http://www.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2017/03/army_cpl_jules_hauterman_of_ho.html

Funeral set for Army Cpl. Jules Hauterman of Holyoke recalled as baseball fan, liked ice skating, eager to join army

By Mike Plaisance | mplaisance@repub.com 
March 22, 2017 at 4:39 PM, updated March 22, 2017 at 5:30 PM


HOLYOKE -- Robert Whelihan was 9 when he walked across the hall to say goodbye to Jules Hauterman Jr., as U.S. Army Cpl. Hauterman completed what would be his last leave in Holyoke. It was 1950.

"I remember the last time I saw him like it was yesterday. He said he was going back and we gave each other hugs and kisses and I told him to get back safely. It was in his kitchen. We lived across the hall," said Whelihan, 76, of South Hadley.

 

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
Cpl. Joseph N. Pelletier U.S Army Headquarters Battery, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 2/13/1951 North Korea 12/21/2016

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 21 March, 2017 09:58
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: New Hampshire Soldier Accounted For From Korean War (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Cpl. Joseph N.
Pelletier, 20, of Berlin, New Hampshire, unaccounted for from the Korean
War.

He will be buried March 28 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,
D.C.

His brother, Raymond Pelletier, of Hampden, Maine, is available for
interviews if you would like to contact him at (207) 852-5402.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Pelletier on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////

In late November, 1950, Hauterman was a medic with the Medical Platoon, 1st
Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, when his unit was
attached to the 31st Regimental Combat Team as one of its infantry
battalions for the mission.  The 31st RCT advanced to occupy the east side
of the Chosin River.  For four days, the unit battled the 80th Division of
the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF).  The 31st RCT finally
conducted a fighting withdraw south for relative safety at the Marine Base
in Hagaru-ri.  The convoy was eventually destroyed by the CPVF, and while
some escaped across the frozen reservoir, more than 1,300 were captured or
killed.  Following the battle, Hauterman could not be accounted for and he
was reported missing in action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

The CPVF and North Korean People's Army periodically provided lists of
prisoners of war during the war, but none listed Hauterman.  Additionally,
no returning American prisoners of war reported to have any information
regarding Hauterman as a prisoner of war.    Based on the lack of
information regarding his status, the U.S. Army declared him deceased. 

On Sept. 15, 1954, a set of remains reportedly recovered from the East
Chosin Reservoir were sent to the Central Identification Laboratory in
Kokura, Japan and attempted to make an identification.  The remains,
identified as X-15904, were declared unidentifiable in 1955, and were
transferred to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. 

On June 13, 2016, the remains identified as "Unknown X-15904" were
disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Hauterman's remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory
analysis, to include dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his
records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,757 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
Remains of soldier reported MIA in 1950 are returning home
Cpl. Jules Hauterman Jr. is scheduled to be buried in Holyoke on March 31 with full military honors, according to the Pentagon's Defense POW/MIA ...
Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
Cpl. Jules Hauterman U.S. Army Medical Platoon, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 12/14/2016

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 21 March, 2017 09:46
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Massachusetts Soldier Accounted For From Korean War (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Cpl. Jules
Hauterman, Jr., 19, of Hampden, Massachusetts, unaccounted for from the
Korean War.

He will be buried March 31 in Holyoke, Massachusetts.

His cousin, Cecile Stuntz, of South Hadley, Massachusetts, is available for
interviews if you would like to contact her at (413) 536-0790.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Hauterman on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////

In late November, 1950, Hauterman was a medic with the Medical Platoon, 1st
Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, when his unit was
attached to the 31st Regimental Combat Team as one of its infantry
battalions for the mission.  The 31st RCT advanced to occupy the east side
of the Chosin River.  For four days, the unit battled the 80th Division of
the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF).  The 31st RCT finally
conducted a fighting withdraw south for relative safety at the Marine Base
in Hagaru-ri.  The convoy was eventually destroyed by the CPVF, and while
some escaped across the frozen reservoir, more than 1,300 were captured or
killed.  Following the battle, Hauterman could not be accounted for and he
was reported missing in action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

The CPVF and North Korean People's Army periodically provided lists of
prisoners of war during the war, but none listed Hauterman.  Additionally,
no returning American prisoners of war reported to have any information
regarding Hauterman as a prisoner of war.    Based on the lack of
information regarding his status, the U.S. Army declared him deceased. 

On Sept. 15, 1954, a set of remains reportedly recovered from the East
Chosin Reservoir were sent to the Central Identification Laboratory in
Kokura, Japan and attempted to make an identification.  The remains,
identified as X-15904, were declared unidentifiable in 1955, and were
transferred to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. 

On June 13, 2016, the remains identified as "Unknown X-15904" were
disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Hauterman's remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory
analysis, to include dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his
records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,757 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using
modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that
were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North
Korea by American recovery teams.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
Capt. Albert L. Schlegel USAAF 335th Fighter Squadron, 84th Fighter Group, 8th Air Force 8/28/1944 France 12/9/2016

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 21 March, 2017 09:28
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Ohio Soldier Accounted For From World War II (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Air Forces
Capt. Albert L. Schlegel, 25, of Cleveland, Ohio, unaccounted for from World
War II.

A service will be held at the National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force
in Pooler, Georgia, on March 29, followed by a burial at the Beaufort VA
National Cemetery in Beaufort, South Carolina, March 30.

His family member, Perry Nuhn, of Okatie, South Carolina, is available for
interviews if you would like to call (843) 540-0987.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Schlegel on file.

For information on attending the services or for interviews, please contact
Pearl Fyderek, Director of Marketing, National Museum of the Mighty Eighth
Air Force at (912) 988-1848.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////

On Aug. 28, 1944, Schlegel was the pilot and sole occupant of a P-51D
Mustang aircraft, departing his base in England on a ground strafing mission
to Strasbourg, France, when he radioed that he had been hit by heavy
anti-aircraft fire and would need to bail from his aircraft.  There was no
further communication from Schlegel.  Historical records indicated that
locals in Valmy, France reported that an unknown American aviator was
captured in their village that same evening. 

On Nov. 18, 1944, a set of remains was found near a train station in Valmy.
The remains were transferred to the temporary American cemetery at
Champigueul, and designated as X-73.  On Dec. 6, 1948, the American Graves
Registration Command declared the remains unidentifiable.  He was interred
in the Epinal American Cemetery in France under a headstone that read "Here
Rests in Honored Glory a Comrade in Arms Known but to God."

In January 2016, DPAA researchers determined that through advanced forensic
technology, the remains might be identified, and X-73 was disinterred and
the remains were sent to the DPAA laboratory in Offutt Air Force Base,
Nebraska, for identification. 

To identify Schlegel's remains, scientists from DPAA used laboratory
analysis, including dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his
records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

DPAA is grateful to the American Battle Monuments Commission for their
assistance, support and care of his burial site. Additionally, Schlegel's
name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at an ABMC site along with
nearly 79,000 other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will be placed next to his
name, to indicate he has been accounted for.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died during the war.  Currently there are 76,074 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
Pvt. Harry K. Tye U.S. Marine Corps Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division 11/20/1943 Tarawa Atoll 5/6/2016

 

Subject: FW: LOCAL CONNECTION: Kentucky Marine Accounted For From World War II (U)
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 13:46:19 +0000
From: Moe Moyer <jmoyer@usocentralflorida.org>
To: moehog <moehog@verizon.net>
 

Welcome HOME Private Tye!

Special salute to Mark Noah and his HISTORY FLIGHT Team for another Recovery!

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 21 March, 2017 09:17
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Kentucky Marine Accounted For From World War II (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Marine Pvt. Harry K.
Tye, 21, of Orinoco, Kentucky, unaccounted for from World War II.

He will be buried March 28 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington,
D.C.

His great nephew, David Tincher, is available for interviews if you would
like to contact him at (615) 956-3652.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Tye on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////


In November 1943, Tye was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines,

2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the
small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an
attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at
Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than
2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.  Tye died
sometime on
the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the
Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which
to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their
Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members
who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on
the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration
Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Tye's
remains were  not recovered. On Feb. 28, 1949, a military review board
declared Tye's  remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified
DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the
remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the
battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

To identify Tye's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical
Examiner System used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, which matched a
nephew; laboratory analysis, including dental analysis and anthropological
comparison, which matched Tye's records; as well as circumstantial and
material evidence.

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc. for this recovery mission.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000
died  during the war.  Currently there are 73,074 service members still
unaccounted for from World War II.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: FW: Marine Missing From World War II Identified (Spayd)
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 20:20:39 +0000
To: moehog <moehog@verizon.net>
 

Welcome HOME Private Spayd!

A Salute to History Flight for their extensive work on Tarawa in their recovery of former MIAs from WW II.

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 17 March, 2017 11:43
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Identified (Spayd)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Reserve Pvt. Donald S. Spayd, unaccounted for from World War
II, has now been identified.

In November 1943, Spayd was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th
Marines, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance
on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in
an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at
Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than
2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated.  Spayd died
sometime on the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified
DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the
remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the
battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the
identification of his remains.

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc., for this recovery mission.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

America's MIA Mission Continues in Arunachal

NorthEast Today    03/16/17

Kuhles, accordingly reported his discovery to the US Defense Department's Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC). A year later, on November... ...

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 16 March, 2017 09:29
Subject: Sailor Missing From World War II Identified (Casto)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Navy Fireman 1st Class Charles R. Casto, killed in the attack on
the USS Oklahoma during World War II, have now been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Casto was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at
Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft.
The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly
capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen,
including Casto. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the
USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the
deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu
Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S.
personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves
Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from
the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification
Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to
confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time.
The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the
National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in
Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not
be identified as non-recoverable, including Casto.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum
directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On
June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for
analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of
his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 16 March, 2017 09:23
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Florida Soldier Accounted For From World War II

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for 2nd Lt. John D.
Mumford, 22, of St. Petersburg, Florida, unaccounted for from World War II.

He will be buried March 23 in his hometown.

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Mumford on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

/////


On June 6, 1944, Mumford, while serving with the 318th Fighter Squadron,
325th Fighter Group, 15th Air Force, flew his last mission as the pilot and
sole occupant of a P-51C "Mustang" fighter. Mumford and other pilots of the
325th Fighter Group were assigned escort duty, accompanying and protecting a
flight of B-17 "Flying Fortress" bombers of the 5th Bombardment Wing on
their mission to bomb and destroy a German occupied airfield at Galati,
Romania. After successfully completing the bombing mission, the bombers and
their escort fighters came under attack by German fighters. Mumford was last
seen by fellow pilots in pursuit of two German fighters. Later, villagers of
Novotroyan- present day Novi Troyany- Ukraine, observed two aircraft with
U.S. markings pursued by several German aircraft. One of the U.S. aircraft
crashed in a nearby field.

In 2008 and 2010, personnel from predecessor organizations of DPAA visited
the village of Novi Troyany, interviewing witnesses to the crash,
correlating it to Mumford's loss, and surveying the site of the crash to
prepare for future excavation.

In July and August 2016, DPAA, jointly with the Ukraine Armed Forces and the
National Museum of Military History of Ukraine, excavated the crash site.

To identify Mumford's remains, scientists from DPAA used anthropological
analysis, which matched his records, as well as circumstantial evidence.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 15 March, 2017 07:20
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Mitchell)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Pfc. Robert E. Mitchell, missing from the Korean War, has now been
identified.

On Sept. 6, 1950, Mitchell was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 38th
Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit was attacking enemy
forces of the Korean People's Army that had penetrated the Naktong Bulg
portion of the Pusan Perimeter near Am-sin, South Korea.  Following the
series of attacks, Mitchell could not be accounted for and was reported
missing in action.

In late 2014, Mitchell's family requested the disinterment of Unknown X-5698
Tanggok, based on a tentative name association.  Unknown X-5698 was
disinterred from the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu
and accessioned to the DPAA laboratory on May 16, 2016.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the
identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 10 March, 2017 12:49
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Jimerson) (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Cpl. Billie J. Jimerson, missing from the Korean War, has now been
identified.

In late November, 1950, Jimerson was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion,
24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, when his unit engaged with
opposing forces near Anju, North Korea.  He was reported missing in action
as of Nov. 28, 1950, when he could not be accounted for.

In September 1954, a set of remains reportedly recovered from a prisoner of
war cemetery at Camp 5 were sent to the Central Identification Unit in Japan
for attempted identification and further processing. This set of remains was
designated X-14400, and was determined unidentifiable in November 1955.

In February 2014 the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency requested the
disinterment of Unknown X-14400. In June 2014, X-14400 was disinterred from
the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific and accessioned into the
laboratory.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of
his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~
http://www.wrcbtv.com/story/34678798/66-years-later-fort-campbell-korean-war-soldier-identified-buried

66 years later, Fort Campbell Korean War soldier identified, buried

CLARKSVILLE, TN (WSMV) -

Going back to 1950, President Harry Truman was in office, The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show premiered, and All About Eve won Best Picture. That's a long time ago, especially for a man who's waited all these years for closure. Still, he never gave up.

"It's what I prayed for," said Rex Cummings of Clarksville. "Never give up. Never give up."

Sixty-six years. That's how long Cummings has waited. Wife Deborah sat with him on a couch at Neal-Tarpley-Parchman Funeral Home as he finally got a chance to say goodbye to a man he never had the chance to meet.

In the late 1940s, Robert Cummings was a Michigan boy ready to join the Army. He ended up at Fort Campbell. It was a post surrounded by acres of farmland, distant helicopters barely cutting through the quiet at night....

 

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 10 March, 2017 12:49
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Jimerson) (U)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
CAVEAT: None

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Cpl. Billie J. Jimerson, missing from the Korean War, has now been
identified.

In late November, 1950, Jimerson was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion,
24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, when his unit engaged with
opposing forces near Anju, North Korea.  He was reported missing in action
as of Nov. 28, 1950, when he could not be accounted for.

In September 1954, a set of remains reportedly recovered from a prisoner of
war cemetery at Camp 5 were sent to the Central Identification Unit in Japan
for attempted identification and further processing. This set of remains was
designated X-14400, and was determined unidentifiable in November 1955.

In February 2014 the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency requested the
disinterment of Unknown X-14400. In June 2014, X-14400 was disinterred from
the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific and accessioned into the
laboratory.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of
his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find
us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4293356/Danish-boy-14-digs-remains-German-WWII-plane.html

Danish boy, 14, digs up the remains of a German WWII plane and the pilot's SKELETON near his family's farm while working on his school homework 

  • Daniel Rom Kristiansen, 14, found the German Messerschmitt plane,and its pilot
  • He was studying WW2 and his father Klaus suggested he search the field
  • Klaus Kristiansen remembered a comment his grandfather had made about a plane crashing ...
 
Inside her Moncks Corner home this month, Roxie Howser proudly holds the flag honoring her brother, United States Army Cpl. George D. Kile, who ...

From: Ford, Jocelyn A TSgt USAF DPAA OPS TASK HI (US) [mailto:jocelyn.a.ford.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 24 February, 2017 09:07
Subject: Remains of USS Oklahoma Sailor from World War II Identified (Dusset)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Navy Steward's Mate 1st Class Cyril I. Dusset, killed in the attack on the USS Oklahoma during World War II, now have been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Dusset was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Dusset.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Dusset.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

//SIGNED//
Jocelyn A. Ford, TSgt, USAF
Forensic Photographer
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
808-448-4500 ext. 3159

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Ford, Jocelyn A TSgt USAF DPAA OPS TASK HI (US) [mailto:jocelyn.a.ford.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 24 February, 2017 08:55
Subject: Remains of USS Oklahoma Sailor from World War II Identified (Raimond)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Navy Seaman 1st Class Paul S. Raimond, killed in the attack on the USS Oklahoma during World War II, now have been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Raimond was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Raimond.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Raimond.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

//SIGNED//
Jocelyn A. Ford, TSgt, USAF
Forensic Photographer
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
808-448-4500 ext. 3159

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Ford, Jocelyn A TSgt USAF DPAA OPS TASK HI (US) [mailto:jocelyn.a.ford.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 24 February, 2017 10:11
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Michigan Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for Army Sgt. 1st Class Robert R. Cummings, 20, of Manistique, Michigan, unaccounted for from the Korean War.

He will be buried March 4, in Clarksville, Tennessee.

Rex A. Cummings, son, is available for interviews if you would like to contact him at 931-206-5294.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Cummings on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

//////

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned 208 boxes of commingled human remains to the United States, which we believe to contain the remains of at least 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents included in the repatriation indicate that some of the remains were recovered from the vicinity where Cummings was believed to have died.

In the identification of Cummings' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial evidence, dental comparison, and forensic identification tools, including mitochondrial DNA analysis, Y-chromosome short tandem repeat DNA analysis and autosomal (nuclear) DNA testing, which matched a sister and a brother.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Ford, Jocelyn A TSgt USAF DPAA OPS TASK HI (US) [mailto:jocelyn.a.ford.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 24 February, 2017 08:46
Subject: Remains of USS Oklahoma Sailor from World War II Identified (Fecho)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Navy Fireman 1st Class Lawrence H. Fecho, killed in the attack on the USS Oklahoma during World War II, now have been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Fecho was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Fecho.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Fecho.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

//SIGNED//
Jocelyn A. Ford, TSgt, USAF
Forensic Photographer
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
808-448-4500 ext. 3159

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Ford, Jocelyn A TSgt USAF DPAA OPS TASK HI (US) [mailto:jocelyn.a.ford.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 24 February, 2017 08:34
Subject: Remains of USS Oklahoma Sailor from World War II Identified (Rogers)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Navy Fireman 1st Class Walter B. Rogers, killed in the attack on the USS Oklahoma during World War II, have now been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Rogers was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Rogers.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Rogers.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

//SIGNED//
Jocelyn A. Ford, TSgt, USAF
Forensic Photographer
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency
808-448-4500 ext. 3159

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Ford, Jocelyn A TSgt USAF DPAA OPS TASK HI (US) [mailto:jocelyn.a.ford.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 22 February, 2017 07:48
Subject: Remains of USS Oklahoma Sailor from World War II Identified (Thompson, C.W.)


Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Navy Fireman 1st Class Charles W. Thompson, killed in the attack on the USS Oklahoma during World War II, have now been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Thompson was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Thompson. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Thompson.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Ford, Jocelyn A TSgt USAF DPAA OPS TASK HI (US) [mailto:jocelyn.a.ford.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 15 February, 2017 08:13
Subject: Remains of USS Oklahoma Sailor from World War II Identified (Pribble)

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Navy Fire Controlman 3rd Class Robert L. Pribble, killed in the attack on the USS Oklahoma during World War II, have now been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Pribble was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Pribble.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Pribble.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

02/14/2017
moe note;

  1. History Flight - http://historyflight.com/nw/ - has brought home the remains of over 50 Marines from Tarawa alone and the search continues. No private organization has done more to satisfy the families of our Missing in Action (MIA) in recent years. Please check out the link provided. A ‘;salute’ to Mark Noah and the entire team at History Flight for their excellent work!
  2. I am not sure why in this day and age of electronic communications a publishing service cannot proof their work before printing. This article references “JPAC” – which has not been in business for over a year. ‘DPAA’ is the current agency overseeing the accounting efforts for all MIAs for the United States. DPAA is the recipient of all of History Flight’s work on Tarawa.  
 

US Servicemen remains repatriated to United States

Pasifik News   02/13/2017

“Over the past months, the US Department of Defence's Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) and their partner History Flight have been ...

 

 
But in recent days, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said it is now "taking the steps to send out inquiries and conduct archival research" to try ...

From: Ford, Jocelyn A TSgt USAF DPAA OPS TASK HI (US) [mailto:jocelyn.a.ford.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 9 February, 2017 10:02
Subject: Remains of USS Oklahoma Sailor from World War II Identified (George)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Navy Seaman 2nd Class George T. George, killed in the attack on the USS Oklahoma during World War II, have now been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, George was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including George.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including George.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Ford, Jocelyn A TSgt USAF DPAA OPS TASK HI (US) [mailto:jocelyn.a.ford.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 9 February, 2017 09:44
Subject: Remains of USS Oklahoma Sailor from World War II Identified (Larsen)

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Remains of Navy Muscian 1st Class Elliot D. Larsen, killed in the attack on the USS Oklahoma during World War II, have now been identified.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Larsen was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Larsen.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Larsen.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

USS Oklahoma Sailor From World War II Identified (Kennedy)

By | February 08, 2017

 

Navy Fireman 1st Class William H. Kennedy, killed in the attack on the USS Oklahoma during World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Kennedy was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Kennedy. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Kennedy.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

USS Oklahoma Sailor From World War II Identified (Cyriack)

By | February 08, 201

 

Navy Storekeeper 2nd Class Glenn G. Cyriack, killed in the attack on the USS Oklahoma during World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Cyriack was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Cyriack. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Cyriack.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

USS Oklahoma Soldier from World War II Identified (Neuenschwander)

By | February 07, 2017

Navy Gunner's Mate 1st Class Arthur C. Neuenschwander, killed in the attack on the USS Oklahoma during World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Neuenschwander was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Neuenschwander. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Neuenschwander.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified (Noehren)

By | February 07, 2017

Army Sgt. Donald D. Noehren, missing from the Korean War, has now been accounted for.

In late November 1950, Noehren was a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Service Company, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, fighting units of the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in North Korea, in a delaying action south from the Ch’ongch’on River to Kunu-ri. The unit was ordered to withdraw, and encountered a number of heavily defended enemy roadblocks, continuous enemy mortar, small arms and machine-gun fire. Many soldiers, including Noehren, were captured. He was declared missing in action as of Nov. 30, 1950.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

From: Ford, Jocelyn A TSgt USAF DPAA OPS TASK HI (US) [mailto:jocelyn.a.ford.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 06 February, 2017 10:16
Subject: USS Oklahoma Sailor From World War II Accounted For

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Fireman 1st Class Michael Galajdik, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Galajdik was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Galajdik.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Galajdik.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Ford, Jocelyn A TSgt USAF DPAA OPS TASK HI (US) [mailto:jocelyn.a.ford.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 06 February, 2017 10:09
Subject: Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For

 

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Fireman 3rd Class Robert N. Walkowiak, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for

On Dec. 7, 1941, Walkowiak was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Walkowiak.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Walkowiak.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at
www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~
Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
 -- MISS
The Defense POW/MIA -- the government agency tasked with identifying the remains of U.S. personnel killed in previous wars -- says the remains of ...

NOT FOUND THIS DAY ON ABOVE LIST.

 

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 01 February, 2017 10:53
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: Maryland Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Department of Defense has accounted for Army Master Sgt. Ira V. Miss, 23, of Frederick, Maryland, unaccounted for from the Korean War.

He will be buried February 8 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.

His family does not wish to be contacted by media.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Miss on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

///////

On February 5, 1951, Miss was a member of Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, supporting South Korea against units of the Chinese People's Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the area known as the Central Corridor in South Korea.  The CPVF launched a counterattack with overwhelming numbers, forcing South Korean units to withdraw, and leaving U.S. Army units behind enemy lines.  Miss was reported missing in action on Feb. 13, 1951, after Chinese Communist Forces overran the roadblock he was manning.

The Army Graves Registration Service attempted to account for the losses suffered during the battle, but searches yielded no results for Miss. 

Repatriated American prisoners of war reported that Miss died while in captivity at POW Camp 1, Changsong, North Korea in May or June 1951.  Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared Miss deceased as of June 1, 1951.

In 1954, United Nations and communist forces exchanged the remains of war dead in what came to be called "Operation Glory." All remains recovered in Operation Glory were turned over to the Army's Central Identification Unit for analysis. The remains they were unable to identify were interred as unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii, known as the "Punchbowl."

In 1999, due to advances in technology, the Department of Defense began to re-examine records and concluded that the possibility for identification of some of these unknowns now existed. The remains designated X-14124 were exhumed on May 18, 2015, so further analysis could be conducted.

To identify Miss' remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used anthropological, dental and chest radiograph comparison analysis; mitochondrial DNA analysis, using the Next Generation Sequence technique, which matched a niece and a sister; as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
Officials from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency take questions during an information session to update the families of prisoners of war and ...

2016

Member Rank First & Last Name Service Unit Lost Location Accounted-For
Cpl. Melvin R. Hill U.S. Army X Corps, Heavy Mortar Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 12/2/1950 North Korea 10/12/2016

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 27 January, 2017 07:31
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: California Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Department of Defense has accounted for Army Cpl. Melvin R. Hill, 19, of Pomona, California, unaccounted for from the Korean War.

He will be buried February 4 in Alex, Oklahoma.

His great-nephew, Henry H. Lancaster, Jr., of Old Town, Florida, is available for interviews if you would like to contact him c/o Caren Benfield, at 352-469-4465 or 805-443-0024.

The Department of Defense has no photos of Hill on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

////////

In late November 1950, Hill was one of 2,500 U.S. and 700 Republic of Korea soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team on the east side of the Chosin River.  On the night of Nov. 27, the Chinese People's Volunteer Force surrounded the 31st RCT and attacked.  Continued attacks over subsequent days forced Americans to withdraw.  By Dec. 6, 1950, approximately 1,500 wounded soldiers were evacuated, and the remaining had been either captured or killed.  Hill was reported missing in action as a result of the battles.

Hill's name did not appear on any list as a prisoner of war and no repatriated Americans could provide any information concerning Hill.  Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared Hill deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered during joint recovery operations in North Korea, included the remains of approximately 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents included in the repatriation indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the area where Hill was believed to have died.

To identify Hill's remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools, including mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched two nephews.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
More than 66 years after he was lost while engaged in combat operations against the North Korean forces in the area of the Naktong Bulge, Cpl. Luis P. Torres, assigned to Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, was buried with full military honors during a reinternment ceremony at San Antonio, Texas, on Jan. 13....

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 18 January, 2017 07:59
Subject: Airman Missing from World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. John D. Mumford, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

On June 6, 1944, Mumford, while serving with the 318th Fighter Squadron, 325th Fighter Group, 15th Air Force, flew his last mission as the pilot and sole occupant of a P-51C "Mustang" fighter. Mumford and other pilots of the 325th Fighter Group were assigned escort duty, accompanying and protecting a flight of B-17 "Flying Fortress" bombers of the 5th Bombardment Wing on their mission to bomb and destroy a German occupied airfield at Galati, Romania. After successfully completing the bombing mission, the bombers and their escort fighters came under attack by German fighters. Mumford was last seen by fellow pilots in pursuit of two German fighters. Later, villagers of Novotroyan- present day Novi Troyany- Ukraine, observed two aircraft with U.S. markings pursued by several German aircraft. One of the U.S. aircraft crashed in a nearby field.

In 2008 and 2010, personnel from predecessor organizations of DPAA visited the village of Novi Troyany, interviewing witnesses to the crash, correlating it to Mumford's loss, and surveying the site of the crash to prepare for future excavation.

In July and August 2016, DPAA, jointly with the Ukraine Armed Forces and the National Museum of Military History of Ukraine, excavated the crash site.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 11 January, 2017 11:02
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Sgt. James W. Sharp, missing from the Korean War, has now been accounted for. 

In late November, 1950, Sharp was a member of Battery B, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was engaged by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. By December 6, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory.  Because Sharp could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle, he was reported missing in action as of Dec. 6, 1950.

Sharp's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no repatriated Americans were able to provide any information concerning Sharp as a prisoner of war.  Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Feb. 17, 1954.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service hoped to recover American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned. However, Sharp's remains were not included and he was declared non-recoverable.

During the 25th Joint Recovery Operation in 2001, recovery teams conducted operations on the eastern bank of the Chosin Reservoir, Changjin County, North Korea, based on information provided by two Korean witnesses.  The site was approximately one kilometer from the 31st RCT's defensive perimeter.  During the excavation, the recovery team recovered possible human remains of at least seven individuals.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at
www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: FW: FW: Airman Missing From World War II Accounted For
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 17:52:38 +0000
To: moehog <moehog@verizon.net>


In the words of the late Paul Harvey – “and now….. the rest of the story!” – the full story surrounding the final day of the most recent announced recovery of Lt. Carlson.   
Compliments of ‘barney’ former B-52 pilot and a participant in ‘Linebacker II’ – December 1972.

 

Enjoy the read

 

From: barney
Sent: 10 January, 2017 12:37
To: Moe Moyer <jmoyer@usocentralflorida.org>
Subject: RE: FW: Airman Missing From World War II
Accounted For

 

The Wolfpack of the 62nd Squadron had a good day, though, losing only Lieutenant Charles E. Carlson for 34 German kills.

 

P-47 Pilot

 

http://www.56thfightergroup.co.uk/62pilots/abell-ducey/index.html

 

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: FW: Airman Missing From World War II Accounted For
Date: Tue, January 10, 2017 11:10 am
From: moehog <moehog@verizon.net>

Welcome HOME 2nd Lt. Carlson!

A Salute to HISTORY FLIGHT for their continued commitment to the accountability of our Missing in Action.


-----Original Message-----
From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 10 January, 2017 11:28
Subject: Airman Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Charles E. Carlson, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 23, 1944, Carlson was a P-47 pilot with the 62nd Fighter Squadron, 56th Fighter Group, Eighth Air Force, and was shot down south of Bonn, Germany, during an air battle between American and German pilots. His wingman believed that Carlson had bailed from the plane. German officials reported finding and burying Carlson's remains at the crash site near Buschhoven, Germany.

An investigation after the war by the American Graves Registration Command in 1948 found material evidence and eyewitness testimony linking a crash site near Buschhoven to Carlson's plane. However, efforts to find his remains at the site were unsuccessful.

In March 2008, an independent German researcher contacted the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (now DPAA) with information regarding a plane crash near Buschhoven. He informed analysts that a local German resident had found parts of an aircraft and other material evidence consistent with a P-47 aircraft.

Between May 2008 and September 2009, JPAC historians conducted more interviews of potential eyewitnesses and research on the site of the crash. Based on information gathered during this work, JPAC investigators recommended excavation of the Buschhoven site for possible remains.

In October 2015, an independent organization, History Flight, Inc., conducted a preliminary investigation of the crash site. Through a partnership agreement with DPAA, History Flight conducted recovery efforts between Feb. 2, 2016 and May 17, 2016, where they found material evidence, aircraft wreckage and possible human remains. The remains were accessioned to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

Cpl. Luis P. Torres U.S. Army Company C, 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 9/1/1950 South Korea 12/15/2016

News Releases

Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For (Torres)

17-002 | January 06, 2017

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, killed during the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. Luis P. Torres, 20, of Eagle Pass Texas, will be buried January 13 in San Antonio. On Sept. 1, 1950, Torres was member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, when his battalion had its position overrun by enemy forces along the east bank of the Naktong River, South Korea. During this attack, Torres was reported missing in action near Changyong, South Korea.

Torres’ name did not appear on any prisoner of war list, but one returning American prisoner of war reported that he believed Torres was held captive by the enemy and was executed. Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of March 3, 1954.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service planned to recover American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned. However, Torres’ remains were not included and he was declared non-recoverable.

On Dec. 20, 1950, a set of unidentified remains, previously recovered from a shallow grave near Changnyong, were buried in the Miryang United Nations Military Cemetery as “Unknown X-331.” In February 1951, the remains were moved to the Tanggok United Nations Military Cemetery. Although Torres was considered a candidate for identification, the remains were not identified due to a lack of substantiating evidence. The remains were then moved to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu and buried as Unknown.

On May 16, 2016, the remains were disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Torres’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial and anthropological evidence, as well as DNA analysis, including mitochondrial DNA analysis through the Next Generation Sequencing technique, which matched a brother, a sister and a nephew.

Today, 7,764 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420.

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 06 January, 2017 08:10
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Pfc. James O. Whitehurst, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

In November 1943, Whitehurst was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Whitehurst died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio, but Whitehurst's remains were not recovered.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 06 January, 2017 08:11
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Pfc. Larry R. Roberts, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for. 

In November 1943, Roberts was assigned to Special Weapons Group, 2nd Defense Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Roberts died Nov. 25, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio, but Roberts' remains were not recovered. On Oct. 11, 1949, a military review board declared Roberts' remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 06 January, 2017 08:12
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Sidney A. Cook, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

In November 1943, Cook was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Cook died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio, but Cook's remains were not recovered. On Feb. 8, 1949, a military review board declared Cook's remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 06 January, 2017 08:13
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Cpl. Walter G. Critchley, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

In November 1943, Critchley was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Critchley died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Critchley's remains were not recovered. On Feb. 10, 1949, a military review board declared Critchley's remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
Remains of Army Major Jack Griffiths, who died in a POW camp during the Korean War, finally being returned home. -- Defense POW/MIA Accounting ...

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 06 January, 2017 08:09
Subject: Marine Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Marine Corps Reserve 2nd Lt. Ernest Matthews, missing from World War II, has now been identified.

In November 1943, Matthews was assigned to Headquarters Company, Headquarters Battalion, Division Special Troops, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Matthews died on the first day of the battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio, but Matthews' remains were not recovered. In 1949, a military review board declared Matthews' remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

Laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

American Missing From World War II Accounted For (Hammer)

By | January 05, 2017

 

Mr. Maxx C. Hammer, Jr., missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

In mid-1941, Hammer was recruited among a small group of American pilots battling Japanese forces invading China. He was employed with the Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company (CAMCO), which was officially termed the “American Volunteer Group,” (AVG) and popularly known as the “Flying Tigers.” The AVG consisted of three fighter squadrons, each with approximately 30 Curtiss P-40 single-seat aircraft. In September 1941, Hammer was among a group of pilots to train with the Flying Tigers at Kyedaw Airfield, a British Royal Air Force airfield outside of Toungoo, Burma. Though most of the recruits were experienced pilots, none had seen combat. To prepare them, the AVG instated an aggressive training program, encouraging their pilots to carry out mock battles. Hammer was killed during a training flight on Sept. 22, 1941, when his plane crashed on its way back to the airfield after a heavy rainstorm.

In late December 1947, an American Graves Registration Service team recovered the remains of three members of the AVG. The remains were declared unidentifiable and were temporarily interred in the U.S. Military Cemetery at Barrackpore, India in January, 1948. The remains were eventually moved to Hawaii in an attempt to identify them, designated as X-633, X-634 and X-35, but identification was unsuccessful. They were reinterred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

In April 2016, due to advancements in forensic capabilities, X-634 was disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

American Missing From World War II Identified (Atkinson)

By | January 05, 2017

 

Mr. Peter Atkinson, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

 

In mid-1941, Atkinson, formerly in the U.S. Army Air Corps Reserve, was recruited among a small group of American pilots battling Japanese forces invading China. He was employed with the Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company (CAMCO), which was officially termed the “American Volunteer Group,” (AVG) and popularly known as the “Flying Tigers.” The AVG consisted of three fighter squadrons, each with approximately 30 Curtiss P-40 single-seat aircraft. In September 1941, Atkinson and two other pilots were among a group of pilots to train with the Flying Tigers at Kyedaw Airfield, a British Royal Air Force airfield outside of Toungoo, Burma. Though most of the recruits were experienced pilots, none had seen combat. To prepare them, the AVG instated an aggressive training program, encouraging their pilots to carry out mock battles. Atkinson was killed during a training flight on Oct. 25, 1941, when his plane was reported to have disintegrated in a dive.

In late December 1947, an American Graves Registration Service team recovered the remains of three members of the AVG. The remains were declared unidentifiable and were temporarily interred in the U.S. Military Cemetery at Barrackpore, India in January, 1948. The remains were eventually moved to Hawaii in an attempt to identify them, designated as X-633, X-634 and X-35, but identification was unsuccessful. They were reinterred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

In April 2016, due to advancements in forensic capabilities, X-635 was disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.
DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 05 January, 2017 08:51
Subject: American Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Mr. John D. Armstrong, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

In mid-1941, Armstrong, formerly in the U.S. Navy Reserve, was recruited among a small group of American pilots battling Japanese forces invading China.  He was employed with the Central Aircraft Manufacturing Company (CAMCO), which was officially termed the "American Volunteer Group," (AVG) and popularly known as the "Flying Tigers."  The AVG consisted of three fighter squadrons, each with approximately 30 Curtiss P-40 single-seat aircraft.  In September 1941, Armstrong was among a group of pilots to train with the Flying Tigers at Kyedaw Airfield, a British Royal Air Force airfield outside of Toungoo, Burma.  Though most of the recruits were experienced pilots, none had seen combat.  To prepare them, the AVG instated an aggressive training program, encouraging their pilots to carry out mock battles.  Armstrong was killed during a training flight on Sept. 8, 1941, when his plane collied with another AVG member's aircraft in midair.

In late December 1947, an American Graves Registration Service team recovered the remains of three members of the AVG.  The remains were declared unidentifiable and were temporarily interred in the U.S. Military Cemetery at Barrackpore, India in January, 1948.  The remains were eventually moved to Hawaii in an attempt to identify them, designated as X-633, X-634 and X-35, but identification was unsuccessful.  They were reinterred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. 

In April 2016, due to advancements in forensic capabilities, X-633 was disinterred and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 04 January, 2017 13:09
Subject: Soldier Mising From Korean War Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Sgt. Edward Saunders, missing from the Korean war, has now been accounted for.

On the night of Feb. 11 and 12, 1951, Saunders was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, and was attached to the Republic of Korea Army's 16th Regiment to provide support during a planned offensive, when they were attacked by the Chinese People's Volunteer Force (CPVF).  Both units retreated east, joining U.S. units at Saemal, South Korea.  The regiment continued to fight the CPVF along the withdrawal route to Hoensong.  By the end of the battle, only six soldiers remained.  It was during this battle that Saunders was reported missing in action. 

Following the war, one returning American prisoner of war reported that he and Saunders had been captured on Feb. 12, 1951, and that Saunders died sometime in August 1951 in Koksan, North Korea.  Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Aug. 31, 1951.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered during joint recovery operations in North Korea, account for the remains of at least 600 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents included in the repatriation indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the area where Saunders was believed to have died.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 04 January, 2017 13:08
Subject: Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Sgt. 1st Class Eugene J. Colley, missing from the Korean War, has now been accounted for. 

In late November, 1950, Colley was a member of Company C, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division.  Approximately 2,500 U.S. and 700 South Korean soldiers assembled into the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), which was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was engaged by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. By Dec. 2, the U.S. Army evacuated approximately 1,500 wounded service members; the remaining soldiers had been either captured or killed in enemy territory.  Following the withdrawal, fighting continued.  Because Colley could not be accounted for by his unit at the end of the battle, he was reported missing in action as of Dec. 2, 1950.

Colley's name did not appear on any prisoner of war lists and no repatriated Americans were able to provide any information concerning Colley as a prisoner of war.  Due to the prolonged lack of evidence, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of Dec. 31, 1953.

Although the U.S. Army Graves Registration Service hoped to recover American remains that remained north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone after the war, administrative details between the United Nations Command and North Korea complicated recovery efforts. An agreement was made and in September and October 1954, in what was known as Operation Glory, remains were returned. However, Colley's remains were not included and he was declared non-recoverable.

During the 36th Joint Recovery Operation in 2004, recovery teams conducted operations on the eastern bank of the Chosin Reservoir, Changjin County, North Korea, based on information provided a Korean witness.  The site was in the vicinity of Twikkae Village.  During the excavation, the recovery team recovered possible human remains of at least five individuals.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 04 January, 2017 08:49
Subject: Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Navy Mess Attendant 1st Class Ralph M. Boudreaux, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for

On Dec. 7, 1941, Boudreaux was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Boudreaux.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Boudreaux.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Duus, Kristen L SSG USARMY DPAA EC (US) [mailto:kristen.l.duus.mil@mail.mil]
Sent: 04 January, 2017 08:22
Subject: LOCAL CONNECTION: California Soldier Accounted For From Korean War

Dear Editor,

The Department of Defense has accounted for Army Maj. Jack D. Griffiths, 31, of San Diego, unaccounted for from the Korean War.

He will be buried Jan. 11 in his hometown.

A family friend, Michael Draper, is available for interviews if you would like to contact him at 619-867-8079.

The Department of Defense has the attached photo of Griffiths on file.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

///////

On Nov. 30, 1950, Griffiths was a member of Headquarters, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when he was reported missing in action in the vicinity of Somin-dong, North Korea.

Repatriated American prisoners of war reported that Griffiths died and was buried at Camp 5, Pyoktong, North Korea.  Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared Griffiths deceased.

In 1954, United Nations and communist forces exchanged the remains of war dead in what came to be called "Operation Glory." All remains recovered in Operation Glory were turned over to the Army's Central Identification Unit for analysis.  A set of remains designated as X-14411 were unable to be identified and were interred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii, known as the "Punchbowl."

In November 2013, the grave where X-14411 was buried was exhumed and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis. 

To identify Griffith's  remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used Next Generation Sequencing DNA analysis, which matched two sisters and a brother, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records and circumstantial evidence.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For (Griffiths)

17-001 | January 04, 2017

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Maj. Jack D. Griffiths, 31, of San Diego, will be buried January 11 in San Diego. On Nov. 30, 1950, Griffiths was a member of Headquarters, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when he was reported missing in action in the vicinity of Somin-dong, North Korea.

Repatriated American prisoners of war reported that Griffiths died and was buried at Camp 5, Pyoktong, North Korea. Based on this information, the U.S. Army declared Griffiths deceased.

In 1954, United Nations and communist forces exchanged the remains of war dead in what came to be called “Operation Glory.” All remains recovered in Operation Glory were turned over to the Army’s Central Identification Unit for analysis. A set of remains designated as X-14411 were unable to be identified and were interred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii, known as the “Punchbowl.”

In November 2013, the grave where X-14411 was buried was exhumed and sent to the DPAA laboratory for analysis.

To identify Griffith’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used Next Generation Sequencing DNA analysis, which matched two sisters and a brother, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched his records and circumstantial evidence.

Today, 7,764 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call (703) 699-1420.

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 03 January, 2017 14:04
Subject: Soldier Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Army Pvt. Gene J. Appleby, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for. 

On Sept. 17, 1944, Appleby was a member of Company A, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, as part of Operation Market Garden.  The regiment was tasked with landing at Drop Zone "T," north of Groesbeek, The Netherlands.  Appleby successfully jumped and was seen on the ground by members of the unit.  However, as the soldiers rallied to move toward their objective, Appleby was seen struck by enemy fire.  Following the attack, he was listed as missing in action, and declared him deceased as of Sept. 18, 1945.

On Sept. 8, 2011, the Royal Netherlands Army Recovery and Identification Unit (RIU) was notified by the Groesbeek Police of possible human remains found at the Groenendaal Farm by local residents.  Officials conducted an excavation and recovered possible human remains and material evidence.  The remains were transferred to the Joint Personnel Accounting Command, now DPAA, for identification.

Historians from DPAA working on cases of missing Americans from Operation Market Garden received valuable recovery information from the RIU and traveled to the original recovery site with the local researchers who originally found the remains.  With this information, the DPAA historians established a list of individuals whose circumstances of loss and last known location matched the remains.  Appleby was among the top candidates. 

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 03 January, 2017 10:17
Subject: CORRECTION: Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Navy Fireman 3rd Class Glaydon I.C. Iverson, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Iverson was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Iverson.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Iverson.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: DPAA NCR OC Mailbox DPAA COMMS [mailto:dpaa.ncr.oc.mbx.dpaa-comms@mail.mil]
Sent: 03 January, 2017 10:03
Subject: Sailor Missing From World War II Accounted For

Dear Sir/Ma'am,

Navy Coxswain Verne F. Knipp, missing from World War II, has now been accounted for.

On Dec. 7, 1941, Knipp was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Knipp.  No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu'uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Knipp.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis. DNA analysis and circumstantial evidence were used in the identification of his remains.

Interment services are pending.

For more information on DPAA please visit our website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa or call 703-699-1008.

~Fulfilling Our Nation's Promise~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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